IKEA responds to Balenciaga’s $2,145 copycat tote

The small, California resort town I grew up in prided itself on being a champion of local businesses, and was very against big-name corporations and stores. We didn’t have a Target or a Walmart, or restaurants like Olive Garden or Red Lobster (not that I’m complaining, although I’m not opposed to unlimited breadsticks once in a while). Because of this, it wasn’t until I moved to Dallas that I first stepped foot into an IKEA superstore.

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IKEA’s Frakta bag (left) is strikingly similar to Balenciaga’s new tote (right). Photo credit: Pinterest

 

Immediately, the maze-like store layout sucked me in and suddenly my trip to help a friend pick up a futon for his dorm room turned into my chance to buy all the things I never knew I was missing. Needless to say, I was converted to the Church of IKEA then and there.

Apparently, I am not the only person enamored by the wonders that the megastore holds. French fashion house Balenciaga released a bag strikingly similar to its famous blue reusable tote. While the carry-alls were similar in style, they differed in price – Balenciaga’s version comes with a steep price tag of $2,145 while IKEA’s can be purchased for a mere 99 cents.

Always one for a good laugh, IKEA’s creative team saw the opportunity to set the record straight on which of these bags was the original and whipped up a cheeky print ad that gave consumers a breakdown of how to spot the real cerulean staple tote.

The print ad reads:

How to identify an original IKEA Frakta bag.

1. Shake it. If it rustles, it’s the real deal.

2. Multifunctional. It can carry hockey gear, bricks, and even water.

3. Throw it in the dirt. A true Frakta is simply rinsed off with a garden hose when dirty.

4. Fold it. Are you able to fold it to the size of a small purse? If the answer is yes, congratulations.

5. Look inside. The original has an authentic IKEA tag.

6. Price tag. Only $0.99.

In an era when fashion counterfeit and copyright are serious issues, IKEA’s advertising blast not only touches on the problem but also adds a touch of humor to it.

 

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